Debunking Denialism

Fighting pseudoscience and quackery with reason and evidence.

Tag Archives: cannabis

Danny Saucedo Spews Pseudoscientific Nonsense About Cannabis

Danny spews nonsense

Science is hard. It takes can often years, tens of thousands of working hours and millions of dollars to research an issue thoroughly. Sometimes, the results are multifaceted, contradictory or difficult to interpret, and research goes on. Thus, it is no wonder that misinformation is incredibly potent. It plays on hopes and fears and offers easy and emotionally comforting answers to complex issues.

One such issue is the health and harms of cannabis, which outside the scientific community involves a struggle between two opposing ideological groups. On one side are the drug war zealots who refuses to listen to any constructive suggestions on how prevent people from abusing drugs, have very little interest in helping those who need it and better combat the networks that supply them. On the other side are the cannabis apologists who claim cannabis is more or less harmless, works as a fantastic miracle cure for almost anything and promote various batshit conspiracy theories about pharmaceutical companies. Both of these groups are profoundly mistaken and are really just two different manifestations of the same underlying problem: refusing to take evidence seriously, especially when it contradicts their beliefs.

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Do Not Order Cannabis Oil Online To Treat Child Epilepsy

Cannabis plant

Cannabis oil is an umbrella term for oily extracts from the plant Cannabis sativa with varying concentrations of THC and other cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol. Products containing even low amounts of THC is often classed as an illegal substance in many countries where cannabis is illegal.

For cannabis apologists, it is a miracle cure for a large number of diseases, ranging from cancer and HIV to autism and epilepsy. For critics of alternative medicine and opponents of drug fetischizing, it is just another drug product that criminals attempt to con people into using by making unsupported claims about products that haven ever been sufficiently tested for safety and efficacy.

Throughout the Internet and in newspapers like Metro, one can find many testimonials from alleged parents that swear that it works. But this is not scientific evidence. There are people who force bleach on their autistic children or treat children who have meningitis with maple syrup and swear that their products work when they demonstrably do not. It is easy to be convinced by testimonials, but it is just a form of emotional manipulation, often with financial motives, to trick people into buying their products. Let us look at two such testimonials that recently appeared in an issue of Metro newspaper.

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